Select Page

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Choice or circumstance?

Suie Tompkins and Kate Godfree in Ash Green in the 1920s

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

Whether from choice or circumstance, she never married and didn’t have her own home, but seemed to travel between the various members of the family. She is with a different family group in every census so I wonder how often she would move between them all. It wasn’t unusual to find them not at their own home in the census, so one would assume that they would visit each other often. I hope that my greatx3 grandmother wasn’t another Mrs Bennett, but I am often reminded of Pride and Prejudice when I am trying to find out about the Godfree family with all those daughters that needed a husband!

In 1851, two of her sisters, Rebecca, then 23 and unmarried along with Ann Maria then aged 9 were with their paternal grandmother.  The other girls also appear away from home at school, visiting other sisters or aunts before their marriages. Sarah, my great x2 grandmother was with her paternal grandparents in 1841 and with a maternal aunt in 1851, at home with her own family including her sister Emma, and then visiting her older sister in 1871.

Kate’s father died in 1850 and in 1851 and 1871, she was at home with her mother in Great Rissington. In 1861, aged 16, she was in Fifield, with her brother William. Her mother died in 1873 when she was 28 years old – too old to marry? It rather looks as though she “missed the boat” having stayed to look after her mother as the only unmarried daughter. The other girls had all married by 1867 and Emma was about to marry Sarah’s husband, both of them having been widowed.

She was with Robert & Rose Hambidge, her sister, in Ascott Under Wychwood in 1881. In 1891, she was at Kennersley Manor, Worley in Surrey, a servant in the employment of Edward Brocklehurst. In 1901, she was staying at Moor Place, Stanford Le Hope, Essex with her nephew Edwin Osborne Tompkins, son of Sarah, and in 1911, she was with her sister Annie-Maria Rouse in Fulbrook.

John Manning, her great-nephew, grandson of Emma Godfree, remembers that she always wore Victorian clothing. His mother Kate’s diaries record the frequent visits to them in Essex and she certainly visited Suie and Osborne in Ash Green in the 1920s, as we have pictures from this time.

She died on 5th May 1937 in Farnborough, Kent and her estate was proved on 15th June 1937 in London. One of the executors was Mary Humphrey, her niece, daughter of Anne-Maria Rouse.


Wikipedia: Pride and Prejudice

Failures: Spinsters & Old Maids in Victorian England

Week 48: Gratitude

Week 48: Gratitude

Thank you very much .... The world of amateur genealogy would not be where it is without the selfless help of fellow genealogists. I learned enormous amounts from just reading other peoples' queries and the solutions. They gave me ideas of where to look and, more...

read more
Week 30: The Old Country

Week 30: The Old Country

Because we moved around a lot when I was small, it wasn't until I was about 7 years old that we settled in one place when my parents bought a new build bungalow in Rockdale Drive, Grayshott. Four years later they moved on to nearby Headley and then on to...

read more

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more
Week 10: Strong Woman

Week 10: Strong Woman

I have been fascinated by the story of my great x2 grandmother, Catherine Whitehill, born in Glasgow on the 31st May 1847. She had a tough life judging by where she lived, yet she raised 9 children to adulthood in 3 cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh and London, at a time when infant mortality was high.

read more
Week 15: From Fire to Form

Week 15: From Fire to Form

A quick query of my family tree software shows me that of those who have an occupation entered, I have 32 smiths or related occupations of whom 8 are blacksmiths, 2 gunsmiths, 3 silversmiths, and 4 whitesmiths and also some charcoal burners.

read more
Week 24: Handed Down

Week 24: Handed Down

I have already got a post about my "hand-me-downs", so I have recycled that one this week. It traces the story of Suie Gillett, my maternal great grandmother and shows how easy it is to get things wrong when tracing your family history! The Gillett Spoons Since I...

read more

Week 6: Same Name

When I saw this prompt, I immediately thought of Jessie Ann Lewcock, who baptised and buried five babies, three of them called Seth, their father’s name. Only her two oldest children survived to adulthood, a daughter, Grace Agnes, and Lewis named for her brother. Her...

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more

Week 16: Air

Flying, civilian pilots and air crew, RAF & Fleet Air Arm, ornithologists, fresh air .... When I saw this week's prompt I wasn't sure I had anything to really write about and was intending to write about fresh air as most of the world including me are under...

read more

Week 9: Disaster

William George Lewcock 1839-1887. St George's Churchyard, Hanworth. William George Lewcock died on the 3rd May 1887 leaving a wife and 8 children, three of whom were under twelve years old. If we have connected the twigs and branches correctly, he is a very distant...

read more

Week 12: Very “historical” fiction

While I am doing my research I am mentally visualising the people I am looking at in the census or on a certificate and trying to imagine what their life was like; their house, the street, what they were wearing and how they spent their time. Because I read, and still...

read more
Week 5: So far away … from “home”

Week 5: So far away … from “home”

........ a light hearted look at genetic heritage. Both my grandmothers were Essex girls, but that is nothing to do with why I support West Ham! The theme tune for Sports Report (right click for the appropriate background music) brings back memories of being...

read more
Week 11: Serendipity

Week 11: Serendipity

Researching our family history depends on careful research over time, but is often progressed by a large slice of luck! I have had two major ones - both when I was looking for something else, one for my paternal line and one on the maternal. Maternal lucky find My...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Week 7: Favourite Discovery

Week 7: Favourite Discovery

I can't write in great detail about my favourite discovery as it involves living people, but it was very early on in my genealogy research days when I was one of the first members of Genes Connected as it then was. My family had lost touch with a paternal first cousin...

read more
Week 4: Close to Home

Week 4: Close to Home

​When I decided to take early retirement and come back to England after 32 years living and working in Belgium, I toyed with several places to live. I wanted to be nearish the coast, my parents were living near Ely at the time so investigated Norfolk and Suffolk but...

read more
Week 3: Long Line

Week 3: Long Line

I was wondering which ancestors to choose this week, but ​I have decided to interpret Long Line as Long List. As soon as you start your family history research, you start collecting bookmarks, favo(u)rites – whatever your browser of choice calls them. The list gets...

read more

Week 2: Favourite Photograph

This is a hard one. Should it be the picture of Sarah Jane Tompkins née Godfree, a maternal great x2 grandmother, which I see every day as it is hanging over my mantlepiece? She also appears at the top of every page of this website. Perhaps it could be the group one...

read more

Week 1: Fresh Start

Where to begin? I could write about my personal disappointment about the UK's fresh start tomorrow, or I could write about my own fresh start when I first took advantage of FOM in 1976 and moved to Belgium to work or when I came back to England in 2008. However, I...

read more

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

For some time, I had spotted references to Amy Johnson Crow's genealogical writing challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and often thought it would be a good idea but simply never got round to it. This year I saw another reference and as it was at the end of December, ...

read more

Schooldays

The de Fraine, Tompkins and Gillett families often sent both their sons and daughters away from home for a few years of education, and I have several times spotted familiar surnames on lists of pupils, which when I have tracked them through other census returns and through birth registrations have turned out to be related to the name I was originally looking for.

read more

Week 23: Wedding

John and Emma Tompkins 1890

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England.

” …under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus, which suggested that such a relationship was incestuous (the same biblical extract Henry VIII had used to cast doubt on his marriage to Catherine of Aragon). If husband and wife were made one flesh upon marriage, then sleeping with your sister-in-law was incestuous, or so the reasoning went.” HISTORY MATTERS: If This Be Error

But it is more common than people realise. I have seen vociferous arguments on Facebook where people don’t seem able to get their head around the fact that the person they are looking at may have been a second wife “because it was her sister” and “they wouldn’t do anything illegal”. Given the large families of the times when the first wife died, it made sense to call on the help of a maiden or widowed aunt.

John Tompkins, my great x 2 grandfather, married his dead wife’s sister, Emma, in  September 1873, 18 months after the death of his first wife, Sarah. Emma was also a widow with one stepdaughter and Sarah had died at the age of 42 leaving 9 children aged between 2 and 17 years old, one of their 10 children having died, so maybe it was a marriage of convenience, but it makes sense. Emma was no stranger to the family – she was with them in 1861 before her marriage to John Gillett in 1864. Emma’s first husband died in December 1871, a month before Sarah, leaving Emma to bring up the daughter of John’s first marriage. So raising the 10 children together seemed eminently sensible and marrying and then moving away from the area would still the gossiping tongues.

My grandmother, the daughter of John’s son from his first wife and his ward, the step daughter of his second wife and also the wife of John’s grandson from a daughter of the first marriage, used to tell us that John and Emma had gone abroad to get married. More wealthy people may well have done so, but actually they married in London and it looks as though one of Emma’s maternal uncles, Thomas Smith, a grocer in Paddington, may have been a witness. Their marriage was announced in several local newspapers in Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire where their families will have been known. Whether it is of importance, I don’t know, but Sarah and Emma’s mother had died the previous June.

Births, Deaths, Marriages and Obituaries
Jackson’s Oxford Journal (Oxford, England), Saturday, September 27, 1873; Issue 6287.

Sept 18, at St. Saviour’s Church, Paddington by the Rev. McNeil Mansfield M.A., Mr. John Tompkins, Town Farm, Ivinghoe, to Emma Gillett, sixth daughter of the late George Godfree Esq., Great Rissington, Gloucestershire. No cards.

Crown copyright

John had been a tenant farmer in Horsendon, Buckinghamshire for several years where his  children were born and by 1871 he was at Town Farm in Ivinghoe where Sarah his first wife died. Following their marriage, they moved to Aveley Hall in Essex. Coincidence or to avoid the gossip? Who knows. As a tenant farmer, John was in a position to be able to move away from the area he was known, he just needed to find another tenancy, which he did in Essex. They didn’t move away immediately – the auction of the stock and equipment took place in 1876, so presumably they finished the tenancy in Ivinghoe first.

John and his second wife Emma went on to have 5 children, the first 2 were registered in Leighton Buzzard where Ivinghoe falls, in 1874 and 1876, the third in Orsett (Aveley) in 1877. Sadly the three boys all died – two of them from diptheria within 24 hours of each other, the other as an infant. One of the daughters, Kate, married and the other daughter, Alice Florence (Floss), remained single.

Image © THE BRITISH LIBRARY BOARD.

I was lucky to be able to spend time with Kate’s son, John Manning, when I happened to choose to live near him on our return to the UK. He shared my interest in family history and could talk for hours about his memories. He had created a family tree for my grandmother for her 100th birthday which I much enjoyed expanding and sourcing. We persuaded him to write his memories down as his own father had done and we transcribed it for him. Sadly he died very soon after we had given him the final draft but  I am pleased that he was able to see it (he used to hide it under a cushion so that his children wouldn’t see it until it was finished). Some extracts follow:

My mother’s family name was Tompkins. Mother was born at Ivinghoe or Tring, Bucks. Mother was the twelfth child; there were fifteen children altogether, ten born at Horsendon Farm. My grandfather’s first wife Sarah died at the age of forty two! My grandfather then married his wife’s sister named Emma; then there were five more children making a total of fifteen! After my mother [Kate] was born, the family moved to Aveley Hall, Essex. For a short time they lived at Rainham Lodge, Essex as the Hall was not vacant.

Of the second family only my mother and Aunt Floss survived, there were three boys who all died of diphtheria. They were all buried in the family grave at St Michael’s Aveley. There is now little trace of their grave, but my children where it is.

Also as I grew older, I was allowed to visit my aunt Floss who had a flat quite near. (John was at boarding school at Lindisfarne College in Westcliff-on-Sea) ….. Aunt Floss was very strict with all us children but she loved us all and had a great influence on our lives. She influenced my parents in that she made them realise that young ladies could not sit helping out at home, hoping they would one day get married. Times were hard and she insisted that they were all trained to be able to go out into the world and earn their own livings.

If the local Essex  “society” knew of the “illegal” marriage or not, it didn’t seem to have affected their status in the community. John was involved in many aspects of local politics and was well known in the county as I found out when I came across the funeral announcements recently.

Emma was called as a witness at the Old Bailey – BOWEN ENDACOTT. Deceptionperjury. 24th October 1887. This gives an interesting glance at her life.

Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act  (28th August) 1907 (7 Edw.7 c.47) was an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, allowing a man to marry his dead wife’s sister, which had previously been forbidden. This prohibition had derived from a doctrine of canon law whereby those who were connected by marriage were regarded as being related to each other in a way which made marriage between them improper. Wikipedia

John died early in the year of the passing of the Deceased Wife’s Sister’s Marriage Act  (28th August) 1907, on the 4th January. He and Emma were married for nearly twice as long as he was married to Sarah – I wonder if they might have remarried when the act was passed.

Essex County Chronicle Friday, January 11th 1907

We regret to announce the death of Mr John Tompkins of Aveley Hall, Aveley, in his 76th year. The deceased gentleman had for 20 years been a member of the Orsett District Council and Board of Guardians, and was held in great esteem in the wide area of the Orsett Union, where his picturesque figure ws well-known. He was greatly interested in agriculture and much respected by his farming friends in the county, He was also a foremost and generous patron of anything connected with Aveley. For some years past it has only been with difficulty that he could attend to his public duties, owing to increasing infirmity. His illness became more acute during the present winter, and the end came at length, peacefully, on Friday last.

 

The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon in Aveley churchyard, the officiating ministers being the Rev. W.E. Spencer, Rector of Aveley, and the Rev. A.H.W. Seally, Vicar of Grays. A preliminary service was held in the Church which was filled to the doors. The coffin, of oak with brass fittings, was conveyed from Aveley Hall on one of the farm wagons to the Church, which almost adjoins the Hall. The coffin bore the inscription “John Tompkins born 1832, died 2907.” It was covered with beautiful flowers, many wreaths having been sent from his wide circle of frineds. The chief mourners were Mr. E.O. Tompkins, Mr. A.E. Tompkins and Mr. J.S. Tompkins, sons; Mr Arthur Miles, Mr. T.T. de Fraine, and Mr. Henry Miles, sons-in-law. Among those who also attended to pay a last token of respect were Mr. W.S. Eve, chairman, and several members of the Orsett Guardians, Mr. C.B. Russell, and Mr. R.A. Manning.

A more detailed account appeared the next day in the Grays & Tilbury Gazette, and Southend Telegraph 12 January 1907.

We regret to record the death of Mr John Tompkins, which took place at his residence, Aveley Hall, on Friday last week. Deceased having been in failing health for some time past. He was 75 years of age. The late Mr. Tompkins was one of the most highly esteemed residents of the district and was beloved by a wide circle of friends. He took a great interest in the public life of the district, and associated himself with all the movements calculated to benefit his parish. He was formerly a County Councillor, but his chief work was, perhaps, more particularly in connection with the Orsett Board of Guardians on which body he served for 19 years; only resigning his seat in March of last year. In both the work of the Guardians and the Rural District Council he took the greatest pleasure, and, until prevented by the infirmities of age, he was seldom absent from the Board Room, where he invariably occupied his own corner near to the Vice Chairman. He was of a very kindly nature and always carefully guarded the interests of the poor of the parish which he represented. When his resignation was forwarded to the Orsett authorities, a step which he took only through a sense of his ability to continue to properly discharge the duties of his office, it was received with no mere formal resolution of regret, but with mnay sincere expressions from those who had for years been associated with him. Although no longer a member of the Board, Mr. Tompkins did not forget the inmates at Christmas, and his name figures in the list of those who forwarded gifts for the festivities.

 

THE FUNERAL
took place at Aveley on Tuesday afternoon. The officiating clergy were the Rev. W.E. Spencer of Aveley, and the Rev. A.H.W. Seally of Grays. The whole village was in mourning, blinds being drawn at almost all the private residences, whilst many of the business houses were closed. The body was conveyed to the church in the deceased’s own wagon, drawn by one of his horses, the men from the farm acting as bearers. The chief mourners were Mr. Osborne Tompkins, Mr. A.E. Tompkins, and Mr. J,S. Tompkins (sons); Mr. Arthur Miles, Mr. T.T. de Fraine, and Mr. Henry Miles (sons-in-law); Mr W.G. Boocock; and Mr G.R. Parrott. The hymn sung in the church was “Now the labourer’s task is o’er”, and at the close of the service the organist, Mrs Skeer, sympathetically played the “Dead March.”
The body was enclosed in a polished oak coffin with brass furniture, the breast-plate bearing the inscription:-

 

JOHN TOMPKINS
Died 4th January, 1907
Aged 75 years.

 

The grave was lined with ivy and evergreen. There was large number of friends in the church and at the graveside, amongst them being Dr. Dunlop, Messrs. Champion B. Russell, J.P., G.F. Curtis J.P., W.S. Eve, C. Joslin, R.A. Manning, J. Poupart, T.A. Carron, J. Woollings, J. Blows, G. Smith, H. Smith, Russell Smith, E. Brown, W. Kelly, A. Parker, J. Cox, J. Elliott etc.

 

The floral tributes formed a magnificent collection. They comprised the following:-
In loving memory of our dear one, from his wife, Katie and Floss; in loving memory, from Cissie, Nellie and Tom; with deep sympathy and sorrow, from Bertie, Dorothy and Frances; Mrs. Robert Tompkins, Louie and Florie; in fond and loving memory: from Tom and Katie, with love and sincere sympathy: in loving memory of our dear Grandpa, from Harry, Ethel and Will; from Mary and Theresa, in loving memory; with deep sympathy from George and Emily; from little Connie, to dear Grandpa; in loving memory, from Osborn, Suie and children; in loving memory, from Joe, Louise and children; from his grandchildren, Queenie, Dottie and Leigh; with deepest sympathy, from Herbert Manning: with Mr and Mrs Poupart and family’s sincere sympathy; with Mr and Mrs George Smith’s sympathy; from Mr and Mrs Woollings and family, with sincere sympathy; from the Rev. and Mrs W.E. Spencer, with affectionate regards and much sympathy; from Mr and Mrs Boocock, with kind love and sympathy; with deep regret and sympathy,, from Mr and Mrs William Eve and family; from Cox and Palmer, with deepest sympathy and respect; in loving and happy memory of our old friend, from Mr and Mrs Clement Joslin and family; with sincere sympathy, from G.R. Parrott, Oxford; Dr and Mrs Dunlop’s deep sympathy; with sympathy and condolences from the employees fo Aveley Hall.

 

The Chairman of the Orsett Rural District Council, Mr Blair H.L. Williams, J.P., and the Clerk, Mr J Beck, were unavoidably prevented from attending owing to important business in town, and we regret that several of the other members were also prevented from attending owing to illness.

Emma survived John by just 3 years and died at Cranham Lodge, Aveley in 1910. She was also buried in Aveley Churchyard.


Findmypast – British Newspapers

Anne D. Wallace, “On the Deceased Wife’s Sister Controversy, 1835-1907”

Week 48: Gratitude

Week 48: Gratitude

Thank you very much .... The world of amateur genealogy would not be where it is without the selfless help of fellow genealogists. I learned enormous amounts from just reading other peoples' queries and the solutions. They gave me ideas of where to look and, more...

read more
Week 30: The Old Country

Week 30: The Old Country

Because we moved around a lot when I was small, it wasn't until I was about 7 years old that we settled in one place when my parents bought a new build bungalow in Rockdale Drive, Grayshott. Four years later they moved on to nearby Headley and then on to...

read more

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more
Week 10: Strong Woman

Week 10: Strong Woman

I have been fascinated by the story of my great x2 grandmother, Catherine Whitehill, born in Glasgow on the 31st May 1847. She had a tough life judging by where she lived, yet she raised 9 children to adulthood in 3 cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh and London, at a time when infant mortality was high.

read more
Week 15: From Fire to Form

Week 15: From Fire to Form

A quick query of my family tree software shows me that of those who have an occupation entered, I have 32 smiths or related occupations of whom 8 are blacksmiths, 2 gunsmiths, 3 silversmiths, and 4 whitesmiths and also some charcoal burners.

read more
Week 24: Handed Down

Week 24: Handed Down

I have already got a post about my "hand-me-downs", so I have recycled that one this week. It traces the story of Suie Gillett, my maternal great grandmother and shows how easy it is to get things wrong when tracing your family history! The Gillett Spoons Since I...

read more

Week 6: Same Name

When I saw this prompt, I immediately thought of Jessie Ann Lewcock, who baptised and buried five babies, three of them called Seth, their father’s name. Only her two oldest children survived to adulthood, a daughter, Grace Agnes, and Lewis named for her brother. Her...

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more

Week 16: Air

Flying, civilian pilots and air crew, RAF & Fleet Air Arm, ornithologists, fresh air .... When I saw this week's prompt I wasn't sure I had anything to really write about and was intending to write about fresh air as most of the world including me are under...

read more

Week 9: Disaster

William George Lewcock 1839-1887. St George's Churchyard, Hanworth. William George Lewcock died on the 3rd May 1887 leaving a wife and 8 children, three of whom were under twelve years old. If we have connected the twigs and branches correctly, he is a very distant...

read more

Week 12: Very “historical” fiction

While I am doing my research I am mentally visualising the people I am looking at in the census or on a certificate and trying to imagine what their life was like; their house, the street, what they were wearing and how they spent their time. Because I read, and still...

read more
Week 5: So far away … from “home”

Week 5: So far away … from “home”

........ a light hearted look at genetic heritage. Both my grandmothers were Essex girls, but that is nothing to do with why I support West Ham! The theme tune for Sports Report (right click for the appropriate background music) brings back memories of being...

read more
Week 11: Serendipity

Week 11: Serendipity

Researching our family history depends on careful research over time, but is often progressed by a large slice of luck! I have had two major ones - both when I was looking for something else, one for my paternal line and one on the maternal. Maternal lucky find My...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Week 7: Favourite Discovery

Week 7: Favourite Discovery

I can't write in great detail about my favourite discovery as it involves living people, but it was very early on in my genealogy research days when I was one of the first members of Genes Connected as it then was. My family had lost touch with a paternal first cousin...

read more
Week 4: Close to Home

Week 4: Close to Home

​When I decided to take early retirement and come back to England after 32 years living and working in Belgium, I toyed with several places to live. I wanted to be nearish the coast, my parents were living near Ely at the time so investigated Norfolk and Suffolk but...

read more
Week 3: Long Line

Week 3: Long Line

I was wondering which ancestors to choose this week, but ​I have decided to interpret Long Line as Long List. As soon as you start your family history research, you start collecting bookmarks, favo(u)rites – whatever your browser of choice calls them. The list gets...

read more

Week 2: Favourite Photograph

This is a hard one. Should it be the picture of Sarah Jane Tompkins née Godfree, a maternal great x2 grandmother, which I see every day as it is hanging over my mantlepiece? She also appears at the top of every page of this website. Perhaps it could be the group one...

read more

Week 1: Fresh Start

Where to begin? I could write about my personal disappointment about the UK's fresh start tomorrow, or I could write about my own fresh start when I first took advantage of FOM in 1976 and moved to Belgium to work or when I came back to England in 2008. However, I...

read more

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

For some time, I had spotted references to Amy Johnson Crow's genealogical writing challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and often thought it would be a good idea but simply never got round to it. This year I saw another reference and as it was at the end of December, ...

read more

Schooldays

The de Fraine, Tompkins and Gillett families often sent both their sons and daughters away from home for a few years of education, and I have several times spotted familiar surnames on lists of pupils, which when I have tracked them through other census returns and through birth registrations have turned out to be related to the name I was originally looking for.

read more

Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

A view of the goldfields at Chewton (then known as Forest Creek) near Castlemaine in 1852 painted by Samuel Thomas Gill (Public Domain)

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, “if she wants it”, and then to George’s older brother.

Like many other younger sons of farmers, George, and later his younger brother William, headed for Australia. George emigrated in 1852, turning 21 on the voyage, and headed for the gold fields in Victoria.

He didn’t make his fortune by finding gold as far as we know, but he was in Fryer’s Town in the diggings in Forest Creek in 1856,  by 1861, he was running a bakery in Castlemaine and by 1880 he was a successful businessman in Yapeen. Along with Edwin King, he was one of the founders of the King & Godfree the grocer in Melbourne in 1884.

“Prominent resident of Yapeen” tells his story and Residents of Melbourne the story of his descendants.

 

Week 48: Gratitude

Week 48: Gratitude

Thank you very much .... The world of amateur genealogy would not be where it is without the selfless help of fellow genealogists. I learned enormous amounts from just reading other peoples' queries and the solutions. They gave me ideas of where to look and, more...

read more
Week 30: The Old Country

Week 30: The Old Country

Because we moved around a lot when I was small, it wasn't until I was about 7 years old that we settled in one place when my parents bought a new build bungalow in Rockdale Drive, Grayshott. Four years later they moved on to nearby Headley and then on to...

read more

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more
Week 10: Strong Woman

Week 10: Strong Woman

I have been fascinated by the story of my great x2 grandmother, Catherine Whitehill, born in Glasgow on the 31st May 1847. She had a tough life judging by where she lived, yet she raised 9 children to adulthood in 3 cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh and London, at a time when infant mortality was high.

read more
Week 15: From Fire to Form

Week 15: From Fire to Form

A quick query of my family tree software shows me that of those who have an occupation entered, I have 32 smiths or related occupations of whom 8 are blacksmiths, 2 gunsmiths, 3 silversmiths, and 4 whitesmiths and also some charcoal burners.

read more
Week 24: Handed Down

Week 24: Handed Down

I have already got a post about my "hand-me-downs", so I have recycled that one this week. It traces the story of Suie Gillett, my maternal great grandmother and shows how easy it is to get things wrong when tracing your family history! The Gillett Spoons Since I...

read more

Week 6: Same Name

When I saw this prompt, I immediately thought of Jessie Ann Lewcock, who baptised and buried five babies, three of them called Seth, their father’s name. Only her two oldest children survived to adulthood, a daughter, Grace Agnes, and Lewis named for her brother. Her...

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more

Week 16: Air

Flying, civilian pilots and air crew, RAF & Fleet Air Arm, ornithologists, fresh air .... When I saw this week's prompt I wasn't sure I had anything to really write about and was intending to write about fresh air as most of the world including me are under...

read more

Week 9: Disaster

William George Lewcock 1839-1887. St George's Churchyard, Hanworth. William George Lewcock died on the 3rd May 1887 leaving a wife and 8 children, three of whom were under twelve years old. If we have connected the twigs and branches correctly, he is a very distant...

read more

Week 12: Very “historical” fiction

While I am doing my research I am mentally visualising the people I am looking at in the census or on a certificate and trying to imagine what their life was like; their house, the street, what they were wearing and how they spent their time. Because I read, and still...

read more
Week 5: So far away … from “home”

Week 5: So far away … from “home”

........ a light hearted look at genetic heritage. Both my grandmothers were Essex girls, but that is nothing to do with why I support West Ham! The theme tune for Sports Report (right click for the appropriate background music) brings back memories of being...

read more
Week 11: Serendipity

Week 11: Serendipity

Researching our family history depends on careful research over time, but is often progressed by a large slice of luck! I have had two major ones - both when I was looking for something else, one for my paternal line and one on the maternal. Maternal lucky find My...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Week 7: Favourite Discovery

Week 7: Favourite Discovery

I can't write in great detail about my favourite discovery as it involves living people, but it was very early on in my genealogy research days when I was one of the first members of Genes Connected as it then was. My family had lost touch with a paternal first cousin...

read more
Week 4: Close to Home

Week 4: Close to Home

​When I decided to take early retirement and come back to England after 32 years living and working in Belgium, I toyed with several places to live. I wanted to be nearish the coast, my parents were living near Ely at the time so investigated Norfolk and Suffolk but...

read more
Week 3: Long Line

Week 3: Long Line

I was wondering which ancestors to choose this week, but ​I have decided to interpret Long Line as Long List. As soon as you start your family history research, you start collecting bookmarks, favo(u)rites – whatever your browser of choice calls them. The list gets...

read more

Week 2: Favourite Photograph

This is a hard one. Should it be the picture of Sarah Jane Tompkins née Godfree, a maternal great x2 grandmother, which I see every day as it is hanging over my mantlepiece? She also appears at the top of every page of this website. Perhaps it could be the group one...

read more

Week 1: Fresh Start

Where to begin? I could write about my personal disappointment about the UK's fresh start tomorrow, or I could write about my own fresh start when I first took advantage of FOM in 1976 and moved to Belgium to work or when I came back to England in 2008. However, I...

read more

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

For some time, I had spotted references to Amy Johnson Crow's genealogical writing challenge, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and often thought it would be a good idea but simply never got round to it. This year I saw another reference and as it was at the end of December, ...

read more

Schooldays

The de Fraine, Tompkins and Gillett families often sent both their sons and daughters away from home for a few years of education, and I have several times spotted familiar surnames on lists of pupils, which when I have tracked them through other census returns and through birth registrations have turned out to be related to the name I was originally looking for.

read more

Godfrees of Great Rissington

Godfrees of Great Rissington

The Church of St. John the Baptist , Great Rissington.
The first set of gates are the entrance to Manor Farm.
© Copyright David Luther Thomas and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

The Godfree, Hambidge, Cambray and Baylis families intertwined with occasional links to the Gilletts lived in Iccomb, Westcote, Great, Little and Wyck Rissington, Stow on the Wold, Great Barrington etc.

Sarah Jane Godfree (right) from Great Rissington, Gloucestershire, was the first wife of John Tompkins (1931-1907) and the grandmother of both Molly Tompkins and Leigh de Fraine … Sarah’s younger sister, Emma, was John’s second wife.

Sarah and Emma were the daughters of George Godfree and Mary Ann Smith.  George and Mary Ann had twelve children: nine girls and three boys, all of whom reached adulthood. Most married, but not all had children.

Two of Sarah Godfree’s three brothers, George and William, emigrated to Australia.

The oldest son, John Bayliss Godfree, was left the farming business by his father . In 1871, he was described as a farmer of 400 acres, employing 12 men and 3 boys. He died, unmarried, on the 1st April 1880 aged 50. 

 

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Godfrees of Great Rissington

Godfrees of Great Rissington

The Church of St. John the Baptist , Great Rissington.The first set of gates are the entrance to Manor Farm.© Copyright David Luther Thomas and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence. The Godfree, Hambidge, Cambray and Baylis families intertwined with...

read more

The Godfree Daughters

George and Mary Godfree had 9 daughters. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised on 7th June 1824 in Great Rissington. She married George Osborn of Charlton on Otmoor, Oxfordshire on 16th January 1850 in Great Rissington. They had four daughters and a son. In...

read more

The Ascott Martyrs 1873

Sarah Godfree's younger sister, Rose Hannah, married Robert Hambidge of Icomb, Gloucestershire.  They were married in Great Rissington in 1859. In 1861, they were farming in Westcote, Gloucestershire but by 1871 were living at Crown Farm in Ascott-under-Whychwood when...

read more
“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

George Godfree was left two hundred pounds in his father's will,  which was proved on 1st January 1851, and by the 30th March he was an apprentice grocer, living with his maternal uncle, Thomas Smith, a grocer, in Paddington. Gold had recently been discovered in...

read more

Residents of Melbourne

  Only one of George and Marjorie's ten children married, their youngest, Ernest Graham. He followed a very different path altogether to his older siblings. Laurence, the fourth son died soon after birth. Charles John, the fifth son, stayed on the farm in...

read more

William Godfree of Kaanlang

  William, the youngest son, was left the same sum of money as his brother George and by 1861, was farming in Fifield, Oxfordshire where he was still in 1881. He appears several times in the advertisements section of the Jackson's Oxford Journal selling wood at...

read more

The Godfree Daughters

Catherine, youngest child of George and Mary Godfree c.1920. She dressed in Victorian clothing until her death in 1937.

George and Mary Godfree had 9 daughters.

The oldest daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised on 7th June 1824 in Great Rissington. She married George Osborn of Charlton on Otmoor, Oxfordshire on 16th January 1850 in Great Rissington. They had four daughters and a son. In 1851 and 1861 they were farming in Hanborough, but by 1871 he was an oil broker/merchant and they were living in Manchester. She died on 13th May 1890 in Cheetham, Lancashire.

Mary Ann was baptised on 23rd October 1825 in Great Rissington. She married Joseph Stratton on 5th November 1851 in Great Rissington. He was a farmer.They had no children. They lived in Burford, Oxfordshire from 1861 to 1881. Between then and 1891, Joseph had retired and moved to Fulbrook  where Mary was buried on 28th September 1886. He died on 4 March 1898 and was buried on 8 March 1898 in Fulbrook. He had his estate probated on 14 May 1898 in Oxford.

Rebecca was baptised on 17 May 1827 in Great Rissington. She married John Foreshew on 28th December 1853 in Great Rissington, on the same day as her younger sister Sarah. They had no children. In 1861, they in Great Rissington, she was described as a retired farmer. In 1871 they were living at Bird’s Nest,  Burford, and in 1881 and 1891 at Signet, Burford. She died there in 1900. In 1901, John was farming in Windrush, Gloucestershire where he died in 1907. His estate was probated on 20th March 1907 in Gloucester.

Sarah Jane
See The Tompkins

Rose-Hannah was baptised on 27 January 1836 in Great Rissington. She married Robert Hambidge, a farmer from Church Iccomb,, on 23rd November 1859.
See The Ascott Martyrs 1873

Emma
See The Tompkins

Alice was born in 1840 in Great Rissington. She married John Giles Brooks, a farmer from Burford, on 26th October 1858 in Great Rissington. In 1861, they were in Hatherop, in 1871 in Maisey Hampton and in 1881 they were in Burford. In 1891, they were  in Deddington and by 1900 they were in Bicester, where Alice died in the late summer of that year. John was still in Bicester in 1901.

Annie-Maria was born in 1841 in Great Rissington. She married Edward Rouse on 2nd October 1867 in Great Rissington. In 1871 and 1881, they were farming in Twyford. Edward died in 1882. In 1891, 1901 and 1911, she was in Fulbrook where she died on 4th March 1916. Her estate was proved on 5th July 1916 in Oxford.

Catherine – Solo – choice or circumstance?

 

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Godfrees of Great Rissington

Godfrees of Great Rissington

The Church of St. John the Baptist , Great Rissington.The first set of gates are the entrance to Manor Farm.© Copyright David Luther Thomas and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence. The Godfree, Hambidge, Cambray and Baylis families intertwined with...

read more

The Godfree Daughters

George and Mary Godfree had 9 daughters. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised on 7th June 1824 in Great Rissington. She married George Osborn of Charlton on Otmoor, Oxfordshire on 16th January 1850 in Great Rissington. They had four daughters and a son. In...

read more

The Ascott Martyrs 1873

Sarah Godfree's younger sister, Rose Hannah, married Robert Hambidge of Icomb, Gloucestershire.  They were married in Great Rissington in 1859. In 1861, they were farming in Westcote, Gloucestershire but by 1871 were living at Crown Farm in Ascott-under-Whychwood when...

read more
“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

George Godfree was left two hundred pounds in his father's will,  which was proved on 1st January 1851, and by the 30th March he was an apprentice grocer, living with his maternal uncle, Thomas Smith, a grocer, in Paddington. Gold had recently been discovered in...

read more

Residents of Melbourne

  Only one of George and Marjorie's ten children married, their youngest, Ernest Graham. He followed a very different path altogether to his older siblings. Laurence, the fourth son died soon after birth. Charles John, the fifth son, stayed on the farm in...

read more

William Godfree of Kaanlang

  William, the youngest son, was left the same sum of money as his brother George and by 1861, was farming in Fifield, Oxfordshire where he was still in 1881. He appears several times in the advertisements section of the Jackson's Oxford Journal selling wood at...

read more

The Ascott Martyrs 1873

Sarah Godfree’s younger sister, Rose Hannah, married Robert Hambidge of Icomb, Gloucestershire. 

They were married in Great Rissington in 1859. In 1861, they were farming in Westcote, Gloucestershire but by 1871 were living at Crown Farm in Ascott-under-Whychwood when Robert is described as a farmer of 400 acres employing 10 men and 4 boys.

“The trouble started when Mr Hambidge of Crown Farm Ascott sacked his men who had joined the Agricultural Workers’ Union and then employed men from Ramsden to do his hoeing. The Ascott women stopped these men from working, and tried to persuade them to join the Union. The women were arrested, taken to Chipping Norton, and charged with obstructing and coercing John Hodgkins and John Millen with a view to inducing them to leave their employment on 20th May…… “

To read the whole story go to Ascott Martyrs 1873

Facebook page: The Ascott Martyrs by Beverley McCombs

Week 27: Solo – choice or circumstance?

Catherine Godfree, born in 1844, was the youngest child of George and Mary Ann Godfree of Great Rissington. She had three older brothers and seven older sisters. Five of the sisters married and had large families, two sisters married but had no children, while two of the brothers never married and the one that did had emigrated to Australia following the death of his father.

read more

Week 23: Wedding

Marrying the sister of a deceased wife was illegal in Victorian England. " ...under the Marriage Act of 1835, which had the support of the established Anglican church, it was prohibited for a widower to marry his wife’s sister on the grounds of a passage in Leviticus,...

read more
Week 8: Prosperity

Week 8: Prosperity

George Godfree was my great x2 uncle, the sixth child and second son of George and Mary Ann, nee Smith, Godfree of Great Rissington. His father died in 1850, leaving the farm to Mary, "if she wants it", and then to George's older brother. Like many other younger sons...

read more
Godfrees of Great Rissington

Godfrees of Great Rissington

The Church of St. John the Baptist , Great Rissington.The first set of gates are the entrance to Manor Farm.© Copyright David Luther Thomas and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence. The Godfree, Hambidge, Cambray and Baylis families intertwined with...

read more

The Godfree Daughters

George and Mary Godfree had 9 daughters. The oldest daughter, Elizabeth, was baptised on 7th June 1824 in Great Rissington. She married George Osborn of Charlton on Otmoor, Oxfordshire on 16th January 1850 in Great Rissington. They had four daughters and a son. In...

read more

The Ascott Martyrs 1873

Sarah Godfree's younger sister, Rose Hannah, married Robert Hambidge of Icomb, Gloucestershire.  They were married in Great Rissington in 1859. In 1861, they were farming in Westcote, Gloucestershire but by 1871 were living at Crown Farm in Ascott-under-Whychwood when...

read more
“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

“Prominent resident of Yapeen”

George Godfree was left two hundred pounds in his father's will,  which was proved on 1st January 1851, and by the 30th March he was an apprentice grocer, living with his maternal uncle, Thomas Smith, a grocer, in Paddington. Gold had recently been discovered in...

read more

Residents of Melbourne

  Only one of George and Marjorie's ten children married, their youngest, Ernest Graham. He followed a very different path altogether to his older siblings. Laurence, the fourth son died soon after birth. Charles John, the fifth son, stayed on the farm in...

read more

William Godfree of Kaanlang

  William, the youngest son, was left the same sum of money as his brother George and by 1861, was farming in Fifield, Oxfordshire where he was still in 1881. He appears several times in the advertisements section of the Jackson's Oxford Journal selling wood at...

read more